Op-Eds

  • February 16, 2017  |  Author: Eva Busza
    Small and medium-sized Canadian businesses that are exporting to the U.S. suddenly have a lot to worry about. If U.S. President Donald Trump’s claims that he will enact sweeping tax reforms and renegotiate NAFTA are realized, our companies are likely to see their profits fall and demand for their products and services decline. As some 88 per cent of the total exports of Canadian small businesses...
  • January 13, 2017  |  Author: Deanna Horton
    The Economist magazine recently singled Canada out as an example to the world. The magazine focused on our liberalism and tolerance, but can we be “cool” too? Japan has done it with its Cool Japan Fund. Are there lessons there for us? The Cool Japan Fund (CJF), launched three years ago, invests in promoting Japan’s unique and innovative products and services to growth markets in Asia and beyond...
  • November 29, 2016  |  Author: Hugh Stephens
    The TPP, at least its current form, is dead. It was on life support throughout the U.S. election but president-elect Donald Trump has driven a stake through its heart with his announcement that he will initiate the process for the U.S. to withdraw from the deal on Day 1 of his presidency. And that will effectively end the TPP as we know it because of terms that state that the agreement will come...
  • November 25, 2016  |  Author: Stewart Beck
    The pundits are having a field day with the results of the U.S. election. But for me, there are two critical takeaways for Canada: First, the level of uncertainty in our trade relations with the U.S. has gone up exponentially; and, second, "Brand America" in the eyes of many countries in Asia has taken an incredible beating. This has significant implications for Canada. Diversifying our trade and...
  • October 24, 2016  |  Author: Stewart Beck
    British Columbia’s liquefied natural gas super-project appears to have crossed the final hurdle only to find itself in search of a finish line. Conditionally approved by Ottawa late last month, the proposed C$36-billion Pacific NorthWest LNG plant on B.C.’s North Coast brings the promise of thousands of Canadian jobs and billions in annual taxes and royalties. It signifies the federal government...
  • October 12, 2016  |  Author: Hugh Stephens
    The news that Canada and China have agreed to begin negotiations toward reaching an extradition treaty has led to a hasty rush to judgment. A number of commentators have been quick to pillory the proposal, citing amongst other concerns: China’s high rate of executions, lack of due process and transparency in its “brutal” judicial system, and political motivations behind the current anti-...
  • September 9, 2016  |  Author: Hugh Stephens
    The news that Canada and China have come to an interim agreement to postpone the imposition of new standards for importing canola seed, due to take effect on Sept. 1, and to continue discussions on the issue is welcome. However, resolving this issue will not be easy and I doubt the Chinese will simply back down. At the risk of being accused of being a heretic, panda-hugger or unpatriotic...
  • September 7, 2016  |  Authors: Eva Busza, Valentine Ostaszewski
    Leaders from the most powerful developed and emerging states will descend on Hangzhou, China next month to deliberate on the state of the world’s economy. The G20 Forum — a brainchild of our own former prime minister (then finance minister) Paul Martin — was established over twenty years ago in response to the Asian financial crisis that began in Thailand and reverberated globally. While we aren’...
  • September 6, 2016  |  Author: Stewart Beck
    Prime Minister Justin Trudeau begins his first official visit to China on Tuesday ahead of the G20 leaders’ summit in Hangzhou. This is a critical and somewhat uncertain time in Canada-China relations, and Canadians will be watching intently to see how Ottawa fares as it seeks what the Prime Minister has described as “a closer, more balanced relationship.” With bilateral trade worth $85.3-...
  • August 15, 2016  |  Author: Eva Busza
    Last summer, as drought spread across Western Canada, water was the conversation of the day. Restaurants began providing glasses only on demand, strict watering restrictions were imposed and we heard a lot about innovations like smart shower heads. Six months later, after decent rains and snowfall, Canadian public attention has died down, but the underlying problem of diminishing supply remains...
  • August 8, 2016  |  Author: Nathan Allen
    If you believe the recent wave of op-eds and opinion columns, we are about to enter a protectionist age. The common people have finally said “enough” to trade agreements that have hollowed out the middle class, generated income inequality and prompted runaway deregulation. The out-of-touch elites and their globalist vision have been proven wrong – the day of reckoning is upon us. The only...
  • August 8, 2016  |  Author: Stewart Beck
    Moving day in West Vancouver – after two years of leasing and realizing the market wasn’t going to plateau, we bought a home in North Vancouver. Our soon to be old “hood” is busy: Down the street, a home is being demolished, the third in the two years we’ve lived here. The dump trucks and the construction are an aggravation but you can rationalize this with the employment generated by the new...
  • July 4, 2016  |  Author: Asia Pacific Foundation of Canada
    PM Trudeau was sworn in last November with a promise to bring Canada "back" on the global stage and to foster new ideas. It is hardly surprising, then, that our Liberal government is placing so much emphasis on 'innovation.' We have heard the term trumpeted from the rooftops by ministers, policy advisors and the private sector from St. John's to Victoria, and all stops in between. And it makes...
  • June 28, 2016  |  Author: Rufina K. Park
    B.C. Premier Christy Clark recently announced $6-million for a new computer 'coding curriculum,' which will be offered in K-9 classrooms this fall and introduced in grades 10 to 12 in 2017. This is part of a larger initiative called the K-12 Applied Design, Skills and Technologies curriculum. While there is skepticism about the value of integrating coding into B.C.'s schools, it is undeniable...
  • June 21, 2016  |  Author: Hugh Stephens
    It was ‎a predictable and entirely reasonable question posed by a member of the Ottawa press corps to Canadian Foreign Minister Stephane Dion, who was holding a press conference in the foyer of the Lester Pearson Building, home to Canada’s foreign ministry (now known as Global Affairs Canada) with Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi. The question, admittedly, was a bit of a “kitchen sink”...
  • June 21, 2016  |  Author: Hugh Stephens
    A paper I just released by the University of Calgary's School of Public Policy debunks much of the hyperbole regarding the impact of climate change in the Arctic on the imminent opening of the Northwest Passage as a major shipping route to and from Asia. I examine the impact of climate, shipping trends and market developments on both the Northern Sea Route across the Arctic regions of Russia and...
  • June 21, 2016  |  Author: Hugh Stephens
    Tsai Ing-wen, the democratically elected representative of the independence-leaning Democratic Progressive Party, was sworn in May 20 as President of the self-styled Republic of China, known to almost everyone as Taiwan. Her inauguration speech laid out her domestic economic and social agenda, but also included an important "gesture of goodwill" to China by indirectly acknowledging the basis for...
  • June 21, 2016  |  Author: Yves Tiberghien
    For nearly a decade now, the Canadian debate on China has been narrowly couched as a battle between necessary trade and fundamental human and environmental rights. Should we enter into a Faustian bargain, selling our soul to scrape together uncertain economic benefits? As the nation struggles to solve a conundrum of its own making, we are becoming bystanders to some of the greatest changes in...
  • June 7, 2016  |  Authors: Hugh Stephens, Deanna Horton
    Prime Minister Justin Trudeau's visit to Japan this week is important and timely. Japan is a key trading and investment partner, and one toward which Canadians have a very positive view. Canada has much to gain from an enhanced focus on Japan—despite its economic slowdown, Japan is still an advanced market for technologies and energy, and a global leader in automotive design and production....
  • May 10, 2016  |  Author: Luo Zhaohui
    The following is a guest editorial from China's Ambassador to Canada, Mr. Luo Zhaohui China is the homeland of tea. Nearly all the words for tea worldwide are pronounced in two ways: cha or te. In the Han Dynasty some 2,000 years ago, Chinese tea was introduced to West Asia and Europe through Central Asia via the land Silk Road. The place of departure was Chang'an (an ancient capital of more...

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