Points of View Asia Pacific - Canada-China Free Trade Agreement

in Canadian Business in Asia   (38 pages)

Abstract:

Canadians engaged in Asia were asked to examine different dimensions of Canada-Asia relations in negotiating a potential Canada-China Free Trade Agreement (FTA). According to the results, China ranked among the top priority countries for Canada to negotiate an FTA. Accelerating FTA talks with China was viewed as a priority with 66% stating that a Canada-China FTA would increase their level of business activity conducted in China.  This survey was sponsored by Cathay Pacific Airways.  

To view the full report, click here.

The infographic is a snapshot of the latest Points of View Asia Pacific opinion poll on a potential Canada-China Free Trade Agreement. If you would like to share the infographic, click here to download the jpeg version and here to download the PDF.

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Comments

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China business is quite risky, and Canada's heavy involvement at this stage is not desirable in the national interest point of view. For example, most of illegally copied software products are from China. Remember, China is a communist country. Judging from my experiences in China, it is doubtful if China is willing to carries out the duties under FTAs while China surely exercises the rights. What Canada should do is to work with the democratic countries such as Japan, Korea, India, EU to organize Canada-led free trade partnership in addition to the current NAFTA.China business is quite risky, and Canada's heavy involvement at this stage is not desirable in the national interest point of view. For example, most of illegally copied software products are from China. Remember, China is a communist country. Judging from my experiences in China, it is doubtful if China is willing to carries...more
To be rewarded with absolutely no risk would be naively desirable. In reality, risk and reward go hand-in-hand. It is important to understand that this is a risk-reward relationship between Canada and China. Regardless of the counterparts, it is Canada’s responsibility to only engage in transactions that are suitable in view of Canada’s risk tolerance and objectives. While the Chinese still call themselves communists, they are also capitalists. China shows that when it comes to economics, the dividing line among the world’s nations is no longer between communism and capitalism. It is political. And that divide is between democracy and authoritarianism. China is a capitalist economy with an authoritarian government. This is no secret. In terms of carrying out the duties under FTAs, the implied covenant of good faith is a general presumption that the parties to an agreement will deal with each other honestly, fairly, and in good faith, so as to not destroy the right of the other counterparts to receive the benefits. This particular aspect of risk applies to both communist and democratic countries. Communism itself should not be misinterpreted as an uncivilized and dishonest mentality – it is an ideology in a not so ideal world. I would also like to point out that software pirates include casual, amateur copiers as well as those who sell and those who buy pirated software products. In theory, countries that are highly impacted by illegally copied software products are also countries with the highest demand. This is not only a global regulatory issue. Eliminating the consumer motives is as important as eliminating the source of supply. To be rewarded with absolutely no risk would be naively desirable. In reality, risk and reward go hand-in-hand. It is important to understand that this is a risk-reward relationship between Canada and China. Regardless of the counterparts, it is Canada’s responsibility to only engage in transactions that are suitable in vie...more